Archive for Steve Cotter

Whats in a typical kettlebell training session?

Posted in Body weight resistance training, Conditioning, Japan Kettlebell Club, Mobility, personal training services with tags , , , , , , , on September 30, 2011 by markeu

 Had a busy weekend teaching several one on one personal training sessions back to  back on Saturday and Sunday, and it was great for me to be around people who all  took their own personal training goals very seriously. It also meant I slept very  soundly Sunday night!

Since some of my blog readers may not have had any kettlebell experience before, I  thought I would take the time to explain what a typical class with me consists of.

The first thing I tend to address in my kb  and conditioning classes are the existing  state of health of the client, any pre-existing injuries, general lifestyle and overall  body mobility.Whether the client is a professional athlete or your average 9-5’er, it  is critical with kettlebells that these points are addressed before working out and  designing a course. You have to know the raw materials you are working with, or it  can potentially lead to disappointment in the student when they cant achieve their  goals or get frustrated by existing physical limitations.

Here in Japan, most of my clients don’t stretch enough, partly due to extremely busy lifestyles and long work hours here in Japan. I generally try to give them a simple routine that they can do daily, at times fitting small exercise/stretching sets into the existing day job when breaks occur and there is time to remind oneself about posture and tension. Men and women that end up sitting at a desk 8-10 hours plus a day are going to have tight hips and stiff lower backs, so oiling the system regularly with some easy stretches makes a big difference in their overall physical experience, especially as they get older.

Starting a serious/ steady exercise routine will ultimately expose any injuries and /or medical history that the client brings with them. I can thank Steve Cotter and his IKFF methodology for a comprehensive and holistic approach to client care, since we tailor each class to the student existing abilities, and work from there. Some clients may end up getting a steady diet of stretching and band work as an integral component of their training, and bring in the kettlebell work gradually. Those with pre-existing injuries will definitely be pointed at band work initially and then body weight exercises to rehabilitate the muscle and encourage once again the body’s true natural function, and gradually start on the path to rehabilitation. Once a level of stability is achieved, weight is added gradually with the kb’s ( I like to call this phase yoga with weights) until we get to the client’s working weight. By that point, the client has been given all the basic and necessary tools to sustain and maintain themselves on their training journey.

All students this week were really serious about their own personal goals and could define quite clearly what they wanted to achieve and the amount of time they were willing to commit regularly to getting there.

Once the arm up and confirmation that the body is ready to go is done, then its time to hit the bells, where we do a lot of work and transition between exercises without putting the bell down. This saves us time for one, and helps keep the conditioning aspect of working with kb to the fore.

I will video a student performing exercises to give them a before and after sense of their lesson, and mix the intensity of the workout with regular stretching throughout to relieve any muscles that are tense of tired. This makes the training session much more enjoyable for the client, who generally push themselves harder than they expected initially.

The end of the class usually involves a revue of work done, and suggestions for home workouts and things to watch out for as they progress.

The general recommended frequency of kettlebell routines normally starts at two or three times a week, and develops from there. Rest is important, as well as diet and what other exercise/activity the person does to support their training goals. Depending on the level of the student, we can go fairly quickly into competitive type lifts, or focus on single arm kettlebell work and conditioning and mobility. Its really up to the client.

I must say that from each student, as I teach I learn a little bit about myself at the same time. Instilling a sense of confidence in a person that they can achieve their own goals is vital, and that some kind of moral support and encouragement is there from me when they need it.

The relationship between trainer and student is symbiotic; often the student gets as much out of it as I put into it.

Enough said ;)

Kettlebell methodology comparison, Hard style and Girevoy sport methodologies compared

Posted in Advice from experts, Inspirational kb practitioners, Kettlebells, tension training, The Girevoy Sport, web articles with tags , , , on December 19, 2010 by markeu
SteveCotter

Steve Cotter

Great article written some time ago but still relevant today on the differences between the two methodologies. Informative and succinct, Steve Cotter walks you through the different styles and objectives and explains a lot of initial misunderstandings about these two popular paths.

A Performance-Based Comparison of Kettlebell Methods

Download the pdf here:

Cotter_Kettlebell_Methods

read and enjoy!

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Rebuild, remake, renew

Posted in aging and sport, Balance, Mental attitude, Mobility, Nutrition, Sustainability with tags , , , , , on September 28, 2010 by markeu

I am somewhat on a personal theme at the moment with these three words constantly on my mind as I plan my training for the coming winter period.

Having had a few months off, albeit unwillingly, I am back on track with my fitness regimen, but I also realize that more than anything, its about balancing the different parts of my lifestyle to support each other, which is easier said than done as many of you know.

Realizing too that all these personal fitness goals revolve symbiotically with a 9-5 work lifestyle, which is the financial fuel which fires the sustaining my own fitness goals. You have to pay the bills too…

Diet and rest are key components here- letting the body rebuild itself in peace after a good workout, and not getting in the way of my own development. Also, maintaining good flexibility with the higher workloads is important lest I step towards bad form, leading myself to injury.

Making sure that my daily lifestyle also doesnt get in the way of letting me achieve my goals is an important one- getting to sleep at a regular time, eating enough and with the right frequency, seriously paying attention to stress and the effect that it has on my daily life, and doing all the things that I need to take care of me; exercise, time with my partner, walking the dog, meditation etc

I am excited, and daunted by the prospect of what the next few months can provide if I maintain both my focus and my health. The key for me in all this is in training hard and fast (sensibly), with plenty of rest and good nutrition in between. More so, the ability to really listen to what my body is telling me from day to day and catch any early warning signs that I might be doing too much, or the times when I can push it a little harder.

Recovery is critical- the ability of the body to recharge after a burst of energy, how long that takes, how many days I can sustain that type of activity before I need a rest, all these things again, in balance with each other. Supplements definitely help in a big way.

I am lucky to be able to have an expert like Steve Cotter to talk to, who is willing to give me the time to talk about my own goals and help me develop a solid regimen. When you see the workload that man puts out each week, its easy to get inspired!

All in all, make sure you set some targets for yourself over the coming cool months,no matter how little or large they may be, and prepare your life accordingly to facilitate your success. The rest is up to you!

Cheers,

Markeu

Steve Cotter teaches you how to do the kb snatch

Posted in Inspirational kb practitioners, Kettlebell exercises with tags , , on September 24, 2010 by markeu

If you follow this, your kb  snatch will improve immediately- check it out!

Steve Cotter earns CMS Rank in Long Cycle-80 reps 2x24kg

Posted in Breath, Conditioning, Inspirational kb practitioners, Kettlebell exercises, Kettlebells & Fitness around the World with tags , on August 16, 2010 by markeu

A little look at what Long Cycle kettlebells is all about, done by the guru, Steve Cotter

Steve Cotter workin’ it

Posted in Balance, Breath, Conditioning, Inspirational kb practitioners, Kettlebell exercises, Kettlebells & Fitness around the World, Mental attitude with tags , , on August 16, 2010 by markeu

Steve Cotter puts on an amazing clinic at the Perform Better Summit in Long Beach California. From Frankie Addelia, and Robert Dos Remedios at coachdos.com

Do Cotter Work!

Mobility Tutorial with Steve Cotter

Posted in aging and sport, Balance, Conditioning, Mobility, Movement with tags , , , , , , on June 3, 2009 by markeu

Steve Cotter responds to requests from international students for information on body mobility.

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