Personal/Group training sessions for Kettlebells and Body-weight training available

Hi all,

Just to let you know that I am available for individual or group training sessions. Classes generally run for two hours, which includes a good stretching/posture check first up, then into some band work/body weight resistance training to get your joints and body ready for work, then the ‘bells.

I tailor every class to the individual needs of the student.

In this weather, you can expect to need a lot of water for training,so make sure you bring at least a liter, probably two to be sure. I train the bells with lots of stretching mixed in, and normally end the class with a little Qigong to relax you.

Classes are tailored to your ability and interest, and generally I give some tips and pointers for develoing your own workout regimen.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact me here or at my email.

mark.jersey(at)gmail.com

Happy training!

Mark

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Whats in a typical kettlebell training session?

 Had a busy weekend teaching several one on one personal training sessions back to  back on Saturday and Sunday, and it was great for me to be around people who all  took their own personal training goals very seriously. It also meant I slept very  soundly Sunday night!

Since some of my blog readers may not have had any kettlebell experience before, I  thought I would take the time to explain what a typical class with me consists of.

The first thing I tend to address in my kb  and conditioning classes are the existing  state of health of the client, any pre-existing injuries, general lifestyle and overall  body mobility.Whether the client is a professional athlete or your average 9-5’er, it  is critical with kettlebells that these points are addressed before working out and  designing a course. You have to know the raw materials you are working with, or it  can potentially lead to disappointment in the student when they cant achieve their  goals or get frustrated by existing physical limitations.

Here in Japan, most of my clients don’t stretch enough, partly due to extremely busy lifestyles and long work hours here in Japan. I generally try to give them a simple routine that they can do daily, at times fitting small exercise/stretching sets into the existing day job when breaks occur and there is time to remind oneself about posture and tension. Men and women that end up sitting at a desk 8-10 hours plus a day are going to have tight hips and stiff lower backs, so oiling the system regularly with some easy stretches makes a big difference in their overall physical experience, especially as they get older.

Starting a serious/ steady exercise routine will ultimately expose any injuries and /or medical history that the client brings with them. I can thank Steve Cotter and his IKFF methodology for a comprehensive and holistic approach to client care, since we tailor each class to the student existing abilities, and work from there. Some clients may end up getting a steady diet of stretching and band work as an integral component of their training, and bring in the kettlebell work gradually. Those with pre-existing injuries will definitely be pointed at band work initially and then body weight exercises to rehabilitate the muscle and encourage once again the body’s true natural function, and gradually start on the path to rehabilitation. Once a level of stability is achieved, weight is added gradually with the kb’s ( I like to call this phase yoga with weights) until we get to the client’s working weight. By that point, the client has been given all the basic and necessary tools to sustain and maintain themselves on their training journey.

All students this week were really serious about their own personal goals and could define quite clearly what they wanted to achieve and the amount of time they were willing to commit regularly to getting there.

Once the arm up and confirmation that the body is ready to go is done, then its time to hit the bells, where we do a lot of work and transition between exercises without putting the bell down. This saves us time for one, and helps keep the conditioning aspect of working with kb to the fore.

I will video a student performing exercises to give them a before and after sense of their lesson, and mix the intensity of the workout with regular stretching throughout to relieve any muscles that are tense of tired. This makes the training session much more enjoyable for the client, who generally push themselves harder than they expected initially.

The end of the class usually involves a revue of work done, and suggestions for home workouts and things to watch out for as they progress.

The general recommended frequency of kettlebell routines normally starts at two or three times a week, and develops from there. Rest is important, as well as diet and what other exercise/activity the person does to support their training goals. Depending on the level of the student, we can go fairly quickly into competitive type lifts, or focus on single arm kettlebell work and conditioning and mobility. Its really up to the client.

I must say that from each student, as I teach I learn a little bit about myself at the same time. Instilling a sense of confidence in a person that they can achieve their own goals is vital, and that some kind of moral support and encouragement is there from me when they need it.

The relationship between trainer and student is symbiotic; often the student gets as much out of it as I put into it.

Enough said 😉

Here it comes….

Lifestyle change. Capital letters. I am tired of constantly struggling with food choices, and wading through the slew of false information out there as to what is best for you, good for you, fat free etc. I can say that in many regards I am as confused as my stomach feels after a normal meal.

In other aspects of my life and training, things are definitely improving. I am hitting some of my own personal training goals, bringing in more and more kettlebell practitioners, and keeping a pretty good balance between work and down time. I stopped drinking alcohol 2 months ago, and I can say that I feel differently because of it. But I really wish that I could get more of a peace of mind from what I eat.

Now I want my regular food intake to support me in a cogent way, hence I have been edging slowly over the last few months towards the Paleo lifestyle.

Don’t know what it is? Have a look in my links bar and take your pick 🙂

Lets just say I am sticking my toes into the water right now and seeing how I feel, reading up differing approaches to emulating a paleo lifestyle in the modern world, and then brainstorming on how I can support that lifestyle change here in urban jungle Tokyo.

To others who might be considering a similar move in the near future, here is a great piece by the recently retired blogger Methuselah of Pay Now, Live Later who pretty much nails many peoples pet fears and misunderstandings about changing what they eat to a Paleo system and how to get there gradually.

Its going to means saying goodbye to grains and sugars for a start. But if it means I am going to look and feel healthier, so be it.

Gotta get back to study.

Peace.

Rebuild, remake, renew

I am somewhat on a personal theme at the moment with these three words constantly on my mind as I plan my training for the coming winter period.

Having had a few months off, albeit unwillingly, I am back on track with my fitness regimen, but I also realize that more than anything, its about balancing the different parts of my lifestyle to support each other, which is easier said than done as many of you know.

Realizing too that all these personal fitness goals revolve symbiotically with a 9-5 work lifestyle, which is the financial fuel which fires the sustaining my own fitness goals. You have to pay the bills too…

Diet and rest are key components here- letting the body rebuild itself in peace after a good workout, and not getting in the way of my own development. Also, maintaining good flexibility with the higher workloads is important lest I step towards bad form, leading myself to injury.

Making sure that my daily lifestyle also doesnt get in the way of letting me achieve my goals is an important one- getting to sleep at a regular time, eating enough and with the right frequency, seriously paying attention to stress and the effect that it has on my daily life, and doing all the things that I need to take care of me; exercise, time with my partner, walking the dog, meditation etc

I am excited, and daunted by the prospect of what the next few months can provide if I maintain both my focus and my health. The key for me in all this is in training hard and fast (sensibly), with plenty of rest and good nutrition in between. More so, the ability to really listen to what my body is telling me from day to day and catch any early warning signs that I might be doing too much, or the times when I can push it a little harder.

Recovery is critical- the ability of the body to recharge after a burst of energy, how long that takes, how many days I can sustain that type of activity before I need a rest, all these things again, in balance with each other. Supplements definitely help in a big way.

I am lucky to be able to have an expert like Steve Cotter to talk to, who is willing to give me the time to talk about my own goals and help me develop a solid regimen. When you see the workload that man puts out each week, its easy to get inspired!

All in all, make sure you set some targets for yourself over the coming cool months,no matter how little or large they may be, and prepare your life accordingly to facilitate your success. The rest is up to you!

Cheers,

Markeu

Better sleep to live longer and reduce stress!

More studies being reported in Time magazine this week on the benefits of a good night sleep.

This kind of news may seem rather obvious to some, but hey, come and live in Tokyo or any big city around the globe for that matter and you will see just how easy it is to slip into an unhealthy late-night lifestyle. No offense Conan!

In Japan, six hours of sleep for many is a luxury that they just cant or wont afford themselves.Late night tv has big draw power as well, with many full time workers not getting home until ten in the evening, they need a couple of hours of just staring at the tube to start their relaxation process off.

Sometimes its a struggle to get eight hours- work, worries, noisy environs, late night messages appearing on your mobile- all these things can cut into your down time. Without proper rest you can forget about maintaining your training schedule or your desire to keep at it. And if its bad for us, you can imagine what it must be like for kids.

So do yourself a favor, and make sure that you can truly switch off to recuperate from your modern day lifestyle.And while I am at it, a little meditation or some yoga/Qigong wouldnt hurt you, either.

Put that mobile on flight mode, and rest easily my friends.

Peace,

Markeu

In the beginning..

image_0093There was a quite overweight and unfit 43 year old who had been sitting at his japanese company desk for ten hours a day consistently for the last year and a half. What had once been a lean and trim physique had gone by the wayside in my feeble attempts to handle my job stress and personal lifestyle (for more information, read my other blog).
Being posted to Europe five months ago was a blessing and a curse, for I ultimately realised that whatever fitness endeavours I undertook, they needed to be sustainable and applicable when I was back in Japan; in fact, just about anywhere.

As Pavel Tsatsouline would say, enter the kettlebell and bodyweight exercises….

And I have not looked back since. With a daily exercise regimen that combined elements of bike riding, hill climbing and body weight exercises, and the gradual introductionof the kettlebell into my daily life, I dropped 10-12 kgs in body weight. So much so that my in Japan could barely recognize me when I got back.

This blog will be both part diary and hopefully a contact hub for other westerners and gaijin interested in exercising in these techniques, and not necessarily relying on the gym environment to do it in.

 Much more than isolating body parts and exercising them, this complete body exercise regime trains your core muscles first and ultimately shows the relationship between your total body musculature.

Its definitely worth a good look at, once you get beyond the initial ‘what the…’ stage.

So, heres to fitness, anywhere, way, any how. Learn through me, my personal journey of success and failures as I master this lifetime discipline.

Heres to the pood!

Cheers,

Markeu